Posted 5 hours ago
"I thought ya liked my slime!" Boo raised his arm up with small droplets of plasm forming.
ask-the-stallions-ghost asked

"Not when I ‘ave ta wash it outta mah ears in the mornin’!"

Posted 5 hours ago
So how about that Boo fellow? He's great at cuddles, gooey, is able to always take you out, and is WAY better than that flippin' Flying Dutchman.
Anonymous asked

"I dunno… Ta Dutchmen’s pretty darn ghosty…"

Posted 1 day ago
"You eat apples all the time! An' I bet the flyin' ducthman doesn't give ya kisses and cuddles." He said with a pout.
ask-the-stallions-ghost asked

"Well he ain’t all slimy!"

Posted 1 day ago
I'm your favorite ghost, right?!
ask-crossfire-hurricane asked

“‘Ave we met?”

Posted 1 day ago
The anon mask flies off, showing Boo's face. He scrunched his eyebrows and gave an upset look. "Aw, c'mon! I'm not even in the top two?!" He asked frustratedly, "How many ghosts do ya know?"
ask-the-stallions-ghost asked

"How many apples ‘ave been eaten? That plus two!"

Posted 1 day ago
u wanna kill gilda too?
Anonymous asked

"Not if she eats apples!"

((I accidentally liked that post—whoops))

Posted 1 day ago
Really? Not one, green, gooey, city boy ghost comes to mind?
Anonymous asked

"Flyin’ Dutchman?"

Posted 1 day ago
Do you have a favorite ghost?
Anonymous asked

"The ghost a’ all eaten apples!"

Posted 2 days ago

Bahhh. Sorry I don’t post much anymore guys… But! (Please read!)

I just needed a break from some certain people that always pressured me into a roleplay, and thus made it more of a chore than a task.
I regret leaving, even though it was for a short time, but I simply was just tired of the pressure, the guilt, and the stress of those roleplays.

While I swore to roleplay with anyone (except one person but they don’t matter), it’s not fun for me when it’s constantly “Why haven’t you replied to me yet?” or “Do you not like me?” or “Am I not important enough?” … I hope you get the point from that.
When you make it a chore, no, I don’t really like the roleplay. Especially if you confine my replies to a linear story all plot out in your head.

I love roleplaying, and I love each individual person that follows me. You are all wonderful and I want to make a comeback to roleplaying.

PS.
This post was made intentionally vague. I didn’t want to be rude and just throw about the people that made roleplaying more of a chore than it was fun.

And finally, thank you for time in reading this. I know your dashboard has much more entertaining stuff, and I’m more than glad you read my message.

Posted 2 days ago
Any celebrity crushes?
Anonymous asked

"Apple The Apple. He’s the apple a’ mah eye!"

Posted 2 days ago
Alright, how about oranges?
Anonymous asked

"But I’m orange!"

Posted 3 days ago
Thoughts on pears?
Anonymous asked

"Wha’ kinda apple is that?"

Posted 5 days ago
How many apple fritters can you fit in your mouth?
Anonymous asked

"Why’re ya askin’..?"

Posted 5 days ago

the-mysterious-mare-x said: Most teachers won’t allow you to cite Wikipedia as a source, let alone copy your entire paper word-for-word from a Wikipedia article.

Psst

Psst

That’s part of the joke

Posted 5 days ago
Ms. Apple, your grades seem to be dropping! Now, in order to get at least a B- for the term, I need a 2,000 word paper on the history of the apple. This paper is due this Thursday. Good luck!
Anonymous asked

The apple is the pomaceous fruit of the apple tree, species Malus domestica in the rose family (Rosaceae). It is one of the most widely cultivated tree fruits, and the most widely known of the many members of genus Malus that are used by humans. Apples grow on small, deciduous trees. The tree originated in Central Asia, where its wild ancestor, Malus sieversii, is still found today. Apples have been grown for thousands of years in Asia and Europe, and were brought to North America by European colonists. Apples have been present in the mythology and religions of many cultures, including Norse, Greek and Christian traditions. In 2010, the fruit’s genome was decoded as part of research on disease control and selective breeding in apple production.

There are more than 7,500 known cultivars of apples, resulting in a range of desired characteristics. Different cultivars are bred for various tastes and uses, including cooking, fresh eating and cider production. Domestic apples are generally propagated by grafting, although wild apples grow readily from seed. Trees are prone to a number of fungal, bacterial and pest problems, which can be controlled by a number of organic and non-organic means.

About 69 million tons of apples were grown worldwide in 2010, and China produced almost half of this total. The United States is the second-leading producer, with more than 6% of world production. Turkey is third, followed byItaly, India and Poland. Apples are often eaten raw, but can also be found in many prepared foods (especially desserts) and drinks. Many beneficial health effects are thought to result from eating apples; however, two forms of allergies are seen to various proteins found in the fruit.

The apple forms a tree that is small and deciduous, generally standing 1.8 to 4.6 m (6 to 15 ft) tall in cultivation and up to 9.1 m (30 ft) in the wild. When cultivated, the size, shape and branch density is determined by rootstockselection and trimming method. The leaves are alternately arranged dark green-colored simple ovals with serrated margins and slightly downy undersides.

Blossoms are produced in spring simultaneously with the budding of the leaves, and are produced on spurs and some long shoots. The 3 to 4 cm (1.2 to 1.6 in) flowers are white with a pink tinge that gradually fades, fivepetaled, with an inflorescence consisting of a cyme with 4–6 flowers. The central flower of the inflorescence is called the “king bloom”; it opens first, and can develop a larger fruit.

The fruit matures in autumn, and varieties exist with a wide range of sizes. Commercial growers aim to produce an apple that is 7.0 to 8.3 cm (2.75 to 3.25 in) in diameter, due to market preference. Some consumers, especially those in Japan, prefer a larger apple, while apples below 5.7 cm (2.25 in) are generally used for making juice and have little fresh market value. The skin of ripe apples is generally red, yellow, green or pink, although many bi- or tri-colored varieties may be found. The skin may also be wholly or partly russeted i.e. rough and brown. The skin is covered in a protective layer of epicuticular wax, The flesh is generally pale yellowish-white, though pink or yellow flesh is also known.

he center of diversity of the genus Malus is in eastern Turkey. The apple tree was perhaps the earliest tree to be cultivated, and its fruits have been improved through selection over thousands of years. Alexander the Greatis credited with finding dwarfed apples in Kazakhstan in Asia in 328 BCE; those he brought back to Macedonia might have been the progenitors of dwarfing root stocks. Winter apples, picked in late autumn and stored just above freezing, have been an important food in Asia and Europe for millennia.

Apples were brought to North America by colonists in the 17th century, and the first apple orchard on the North American continent was planted in Boston by Reverend William Blaxton in 1625. The only apples native to North America are crab apples, which were once called “common apples”. Apple varieties brought as seed from Europe were spread along Native American trade routes, as well as being cultivated on Colonial farms. An 1845 United States apples nursery catalogue sold 350 of the “best” varieties, showing the proliferation of new North American varieties by the early 19th century. In the 20th century, irrigation projects in Eastern Washington began and allowed the development of the multibillion dollar fruit industry, of which the apple is the leading product.

Until the 20th century, farmers stored apples in frostproof cellars during the winter for their own use or for sale. Improved transportation of fresh apples by train and road replaced the necessity for storage. In the 21st century, long-term storage again came into popularity, as “controlled atmosphere” facilities were used to keep apples fresh year-round. Controlled atmosphere facilities use high humidity and low oxygen and carbon dioxide levels to maintain fruit freshness.